Nissan Juke: Second-gen crossover due in 2019 – report

Design boss says new model will look very different, but still distinctive.

An all-new Nissan Juke is on the on the horizon, set to debut before the end of the year according to a new report out of the UK.

Speaking with Autocar, Nissan’s global head of design, Alfonso Albaisa, said the second-generation Juke “doesn’t look too much like the [current] one”, though will still sport a bold and distinctive design like the original.

Additionally, Albaisa said “it doesn’t look like the IMx or new Leaf, either. It’s an urban meteor with a nasty attitude”.

“Our job was easier with the first one, because there was nothing else like it. And that car’s success was so huge even given how polarising it looked,” Albaisa continued.

“The second one couldn’t be derivative or evolutionary and still be a Juke. We’d almost have to change its name to ‘Nancy’, otherwise.”

In terms of timing, Nissan’s design boss said the next-gen crossover “is certainly coming soon”, leading the British publication to believe the global debut is only months away.

A logical assumption is that the Juke will be revealed at the Paris motor show in October, ahead of a European market launch early next year.

It’s believed the new Juke will be based on the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance’s ‘V’ platform (formerly known as the ‘B’ platform), which already underpins the Renault Captur and Nissan Micra.

Autocar adds the next-gen crossover will drop naturally-aspirated engines from the line-up in favour of an all-turbo petrol and diesel family, including the 898cc three-cylinder and 1.2-litre turbo petrols used in European versions of the Micra and Qashqai respectively.

The Nissan Juke has been something of a sales success for the Japanese brand, having ticked over a million units last month in its eighth year on sale. It has also surpassed 100,000 units per annum in Europe alone four times during its life cycle.

In Australia, however, the Juke hasn’t been so popular of late. Last month Nissan’s smallest crossover managed 56 registrations, 50 per cent down on the same period in 2017. Furthermore, its year-to-date figure of 416 units is 52.1 per cent down on January-July last year.